Community Garden in The US

Published on Feb 23, 2015

“The veggies all go to people who have a hard time affording fresh vegetables. Last week we harvested 400 pounds of vegetables [for the Rainier Valley Food bank]…. It will last them about two hours. That’s the demand.” Farm coordinator Scott Behmer gives us a tour of a derelict lot transformed into a small urban farm. In an area with widely diverse demographics, work trade volunteers help in the garden and take vegetables home with them. The children’s garden has “See, Touch, Taste, and Mint” beds with plants highlighting these themes. In the “Verma Composting” bin, kids get to be up front and personal with bugs and worms! Scott’s advice for others: Be flexible. Adapt the garden to peoples’ food preferences and time schedules. Seattle Community Farm is a project of Solid Ground in Seattle, Washington. [solid-ground.org/programs/nutrition/com­munityfarm] Episode 283.

At Janaia’s journal “http://peakmoment.tv/journal/seattle-…

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Peak Moment 193: More than a community garden, this sharing garden provides fresh produce for all who’ve contributed to it, with surplus going to the local food bank. Coordinators Chris Burns and Llyn Peabody note that with one large plot rather than separate plots, Alpine Sharing Garden enables more efficient food production – from watering to optimizing for pollinators. They share tips for getting started, garden planning, communicating with volunteers, garden practices like deep mulch, and especially the joy of giving without expecting a return. [http://www.alpinegarden.blogspot.com]

Uploaded on Apr 19, 2008
Peak Moment 106: Patrick Marcus and other motivated citizens sprouted a community garden on city land slated to be a park in Ashland, Oregon. When the garden was threatened by plans to develop the park, they got active. Their research and advocacy led to official policy supporting community gardens in city parks. As the volunteer garden manager, Patrick affirms gardening isn’t just for leisure — it helps build community. It creates bonds among people from diverse social spheres — through shared work, classes, potlucks and, most of all, shared passion. [www.communitygarden.org]

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Published on Dec 6, 2013
“We’re enjoying the abundance and the feeling of richness and generosity along with everybody else,” say Sharing Gardens coordinators Chris Burns and Llyn Peabody. During this five-year experiment in the giving economy, the garden has tripled in size. Sharegivers (volunteers) of all ages work in the gardens. They share the bounteous harvest with food bank recipients, churches, gleaners and others in their community. No money is exchanged. Materials and labor, and even use of the property, are freely given and showing up in abundance. Llyn and Chris are now living rent-free in a house owned by a volunteer. Observing that “giving keeps coming around full circle,” they offer advice for stepping into the giving economy in our lives today, starting small and simply. Episode 252. [http://www.thesharinggardens.blogspot…]

Uploaded on Jun 9, 2007
Peak Moment 62: Take a whirlwind tour of the Brookside Energy Farm with Jason Bradford and Christoffer Hansen at planting time. Along with perennials, annuals, a food forest, and dryland crops (grains), they’re growing Jerusalem artichoke and dale sorghum to produce both food and energy (ethanol). Watch Chris cut sod with a Swiss glaser hoe — a 1/6 horsepower guy! [www.energyfarms.net]

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